December 29, 1967: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly released in US cinemas

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The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966)

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly is a 1966 epic Spaghetti Western film, an international co-production between Italy, Spain, West Germany and the United States.

The film is known for Leone’s use of long shots and close-up cinematography, as well as his distinctive use of violence, tension, and stylistic gunfights. The plot revolves around three gunslingers competing to find fortune in a buried cache of Confederate gold amid the violent chaos of the American Civil War (specifically the New Mexico Campaign in 1862), while participating in many battles and duels along the way. The film was the third collaboration between director Sergio Leone and Clint Eastwood, and the second with Lee Van Cleef.

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly was marketed as the third and final instalment in the Dollars Trilogy, following A Fistful of Dollars and For a Few Dollars More. The film was a financial success, grossing over $25 million at the box office, and is credited with catapulting Eastwood into stardom. Due to general disapproval of the Spaghetti Western genre at the time, critical reception of the film following its release was mixed, but it gained critical acclaim in later years. The Good, the Bad and the Ugly is now seen as one of the greatest and most influential Western movies.

First…”A Fistful of Dollars” Then…”For a Few Dollars More”

THIS TIME THE JACKPOT’S A COOL $200,000

…Five of the West’s fastest guns say come and get it!

Three different men of three different tempers and tastes get involved in a long and full-of-adventure battle in order to find a fortune in gold. While the first man who is an ex-bounty hunter and a forgiving person knows the name of the cemetery which the gold is buried in, the second who is a fast-tempered greedy man knows the name on the grave. But the third person, a cruel cold-blooded murderer, knows none; so he has to reach the gold in his own way of finding something. [IMDb]

Notable cast & crew

  • Clint Eastwood, “Blondie” (aka The Man With No Name), The Good
  • Eli Wallach, “Tuco Benedicto Pacífico Juan María Ramírez” (aka “The Rat” according to Blondie), The Ugly
  • Lee Van Cleef, “Angel Eyes”, The Bad
  • Sergio Leone, director, co-writer
  • Ennio Morricone, music

Soundtrack

Originally released December 29, 1967, it was re-released onto CD October 25, 1990. The enhance and extended score provided below was released in 2004.

Find out more*

Source of information, pictures etc is Wikipedia* unless stated otherwise.

*Prof Nostalgia & the20thcentury.today are not responsible for external links

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December 19, 1969: On Her Majesty’s Secret Service released in UK & US cinemas

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On Her Majesty’s Secret Service is a British spy film and the sixth in the James Bond series produced byby Eon Productions. It is based on the 1963 novel of the same name by Ian Fleming. Following Sean Connery‘s decision to retire from the role after You Only Live Twice, Eon Productions selected an unknown actor and model, George Lazenby, to play the part of James Bond. During the making of the film, Lazenby announced that he would play the role of Bond only once.

In the film, Bond faces Blofeld (Telly Savalas), who is planning to hold the world ransom by the threat of sterilising the world’s food supply through a group of brainwashed “angels of death”. Along the way Bond meets, falls in love with, and eventually marries Contessa Teresa di Vicenzo (Diana Rigg).

It is the only Bond film to be directed by Peter R. Hunt, who had served as a film editor and second unit director on previous films in the series. Hunt, along with producers Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman, decided to produce a more realistic film that would follow the novel closely. It was shot in Switzerland, England, and Portugal from October 1968 to May 1969. Although its cinema release was not as lucrative as its predecessor You Only Live Twice, On Her Majesty’s Secret Service was still one of the top performing films of the year. Critical reviews upon release were mixed, but the film’s reputation has improved greatly over time.

FAR UP! FAR OUT! FAR MORE!

James Bond 007 is back!

Whilst on leave, British agent James Bond prevents a young woman, Tracy Draco, from committing suicide. Her father is the head of a powerful crime syndicate who is impressed by Bond and wants him to protect his daughter by marrying her. In exchange he offers Bond information which will lead 007 to his arch enemy Ernst Blofeld. At first Bond agrees to the deal purely to fulfil his objective to kill Blofeld but later he grows to love Tracy but when the British learn that Blofeld plans to destroy mankind with a deadly virus, 007 is torn between his loyalty to his county and his intent to marry Tracy. [IMDb.com]

Find out more*

Notable cast & crew

  • George Lazenby, “James Bond”
  • Diana Rigg, “Countess Tracy di Vicenzo”
  • Telly Savalas, “Ernst Stavro Blofeld”
  • Bernard Lee, “M”
  • Lois Maxwell, “Miss Moneypenny”
  • George Baker, “Sir Hilary Bray”
  • Bernard Horsfall, “Shaun Campbell”
  • Desmond Llewelyn, “Q”

Blofeld’s Angels of Death

  • Catherine Schell, “Nancy”
  • Joanna Lumley, “English girl”
  • Julie Ege, “Scandinavian Girl”
  • Jenny Hanley, “Irish girl”

Crew

  • Peter R Hunt, director
  • Harry Saltzman, co-producer
  • Albert R Broccoli, co-producer
  • John Barry, music
  • Eon Productions, production company
  • United Artists, distributor

October 10, 1968 on BBC1: Top of the Pops

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Top of the Pops (1964-2006), February 1968 title [YouTube]

19:30 – Top of the Pops

Discs-Stars-News from this week’s TOP TWENTY

Introduced by Alan Freeman, with the Top of the Pops Orchestra

THIS WEEK’s NUMBER ONE SINGLE:

“Those Were The Days” by Mary Hopkin


*Prof Nostalgia and The 20th Century Today is not responsible for content on external sites.

October 3, 1968 on BBC1: Top of the Pops

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Top of the Pops (1964-2006), February 1968 title [YouTube]

19:30 – Top of the Pops

Discs-Stars-News from this week’s TOP TWENTY

Introduced tonight by Stuart Henry, with the Top of the Pops Orchestra

THIS WEEK’s NUMBER ONE SINGLE:

“Those Were The Days” by Mary Hopkin


*Prof Nostalgia and The 20th Century Today is not responsible for content on external sites.

October 1, 1968 on BBC 2: Fanny Craddock

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Fanny Cradock (1909-1994), pictured in 1976 [Wikipedia]

20:50 – Fanny Craddock

“Colourful Cookery”

In this series Fanny Cradock will be showing how even the most economical dishes can be made to look appetising and attractive

1: Hunter’s Pot and Lemon Fruit Ice

Presented by Betty White

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Colourful Cookery with Fanny Craddock [AbeBooks]
Recipes demonstrated in these programmes will be published as a booklet on November 14 (2s. 6d. from booksellers, or 3s. 3d. by post from BBC Publications, P.O. Box 1AR, London. W.1.)


*Prof Nostalgia and The 20th Century Today is not responsible for content on external sites.

October 1, 1968 on BBC 2: Floodlit Rugby League Competition

20:00 – Floodlit Rugby League Competition

LEEDS v. SALFORD (blue and (red) amber)

for the BBC-2 Trophy

The first match of the first round direct from Headingley, Leeds

  • Commentator, Eddie Waring

This year’s competition gets off to a glittering start with Leeds meeting Salford at Headingley – scene of last year’s epic final between Leigh and Castleford.

Leeds won the Rugby League Challenge Cup at Wembley in May in a controversial waterlogged final after a superb season. And big-spending Salford are maintaining their position as Lancashire’s most exciting club by signing players like former British Lions captain David Watkins.

The Floodlit Competition has emerged as Rugby League’s ‘ mini-cup ‘— and this time the absolute cream of the Northern game are lined up to compete. Thrills and fierce rivalry are guaranteed.


*Prof Nostalgia and The 20th Century Today is not responsible for content on external sites.